Get the Best Fly Ashes from Cenosphere Exporter

Cenospheres are inert hollow silicate spheres. They are largely used to reduce the weight of Plastics, Rubbers, Resins, cement etc. used widely as stuffing lubricants in oil drilling operations under high heat and high-stress conditions down the hole. Also used as oil well cementing, mud putty and other related applications. Cenosphere exporters use it for an extended plastic compounds, as they are well-suited with plastisols thermoplastics, Latex, Epoxies, Phenolic resins, Polyesters, and urethanes. The compatibility of Cenospheres with special cement and adhesives coating and composites have been well recognized. Cenosphere is broadly used in a range of products, including sports equipment, automobile bodies, insulations, paints and fire, marine craft bodies, and heat protection devices.

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Cenosphere exporter exports the cenosphere having chemical properties as:

  • Silica: 50-60%
  • Aluminum: 33-39%
  • Iron Oxide: 1.3-5%
  • Calcium: 0.5-1.5%
  • CO2 Gas: 70%
  • Manganese: 0.8-1.5%
  • Nitrogen Gas: 30%

What is the type cenosphere exporter use to export?

 Fly Ash: It is one of the residues generated in the combustion of coal. Fly ash is generally taken from the chimneys of power generation, where the bottom ash is removed from the foot of the furnace. Before, fly ash was usually released into the atmosphere with the smoke stack, but today pollution control equipment has mandated to capture the ashes earlier to release. Conditional upon the source and character of the coal being burned, the mechanisms of the fly ash produced vary significantly, but all fly ash includes generous amounts of silica (silicon dioxide, SiO2) (both amorphous and crystalline) and lime (calcium oxide, CaO).

ASTM 618F: Fly ash is defined into two classes by ASTM C618- Class F fly ash, and Class C fly ash. Both the classes differentiate each other on the basis of the amount of silica, calcium, iron, and alumina present in the ash. Thus, the chemical properties of the fly ash are generally influenced by the chemical contamination in the coal burned.

The burning of harder, older anthracite and bituminous coal typically produces Class F fly ash, whereas Class C fly ash is produced from the burning of younger lignite or sub bituminous coal, in addition to having pozzolanic properties, also has some self-cementing properties.

Quality Approved Cenosphere from India

Like fly ash, cenospheres are naturally occurring by-products of the burning process at coal-fired power plants. Unlike fly ash though, cenospheres are lightweight, inert, hollow spheres comprised largely of silica and alumina and filled with air and/or gases. Since they are inert, they are not considered a pozzolan. And because they are very small and have high compressive strengths, cenospheres can be used as structural lightweight filler.

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Cenosphere from India has some general properties:

  • Chemical Properties:
  • Silica: 48% – 74%
  • Alumina: 26% – 45%
  • Iron: 1.5% – 4.00%

        2     Physical Properties:

  • Size: 75-400 microns
  • Bulk Density: 0.20-0.25 grams per cubic centimeter (g/cc)
  • Specific Gravity: <0.4 g/cc
  • Compressive Strength: ~90% survival @ 2500psi
  • Softening Point: 1040 degrees C
  • Color: Light tan

Cenosphere from India can be studied through Chemical engineering.  The progress of the Cenosphere Enhancement and Optimization Project is an initiative that seeks to improve existing methods of cenosphere extraction. Cenosphere is primarily used to create lightweight cement. It is also a good filler for polymers and its benefits are well-noted, particularly in the construction industry. Cement made with cenosphere is much lighter and this eases the burden shouldered by construction workers on a daily basis.

How cenosphere from India are produced?

Cenospheres are produced in very large amount in thermal power plants. They are always looked upon as fillers used to reduce the density and cost of the polymer. If cenosphere particles are allowed to remain properly dispersed by taking it in lower concentration, significant improvement in its mechanical, thermal, electrical, crystallinity, colorimetric and morphological properties are expected. To make it happen, epoxy/cenosphere composites were prepared, having lower concentration of cenosphere. Concentration of cenosphere in epoxy, cured with triethylenetetramine, was changed as 0, 3, 5, 7 and 10. Tensile Strength, Tensile Modulus, Percentage Elongation at Break and Crystallinity decreased, whereas, Flexural Strength and Flexural Modulus were found to have increased by 50% and above 100% respectively at 7 phr loading of cenosphere in epoxy. Thermal and electrical stability also increased with increase in concentration of cenosphere in the epoxy; however, the samples became blackish with increased addition of cenosphere. Using SEM analysis it was found that, cenospheres were properly and uniformly dispersed at 7 phr concentration and formed aggregates at 10 phr concentration.

Know More About Cenospheres

A cenospheres are lightweight, inert, hollow sphere made largely of silica and alumina and filled with air or inert gas, typically produced as a byproduct of coal combustion at thermal power plants. The color of cenospheres varies from gray to almost white and their density is about 0.4–0.8 g/cm3 (0.014–0.029 lb/cu in), which gives them a great buoyancy

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Benefits of Cenospheres

  • Strength: Bonding, internal structure; asphalt, concretes, paints, ceramics.
  • Sphericity: Ball bearing effect for molding, trowel work, lubricity.
  • Reduced Weight: Light-weighting; filler loading, reduced shrinkage, lower viscosity.
  • Sound Attenuation: Noise and RF absorption and reflection.
  • Refractory: Foundries and high temperature coatings and flame-retardants.
  • Thermal reflectivity.

Cenospheres can be used for various utilities such as:

  • Ceramics→ Tiles, firebricks, coatings, refractory, insulating materials, and high temperature cement.
  • Construction → Acoustic enhancement, acrylic, adhesives, coatings, backer board, wall panels, cements, cultured marble, etc.
  • Coatings→ highways, driveways, underground pipes, and heat-shielding requirements.
  • Automotive→ Soundproofing, under-coatings, brake pads, sealants, body fillers and putties, composites, steering wheels.
  • Recreation→ flotation, bowling balls, surf boards, golf equipment, marine compounds, kayaks.
  • Oil field→ Cementing, drilling muds (decrease slurry density without increased water content).
  • Plastics→ Polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, PVC, compounding, film, urethane, potting compounds.
  • Aerospace→ Ceramic insulation, tortuous path matrix, propeller blades.
  • Cenospheres Production Process- The process of burning coal in thermal power plants produces fly ash containing ceramic particles made largely of alumina and silica. They are produced at temperatures of 1,500 to 1,750 °C (2,730 to 3,180 °F) through complicated chemical and physical transformation. Their chemical composition and structure varies considerably depending on the composition of coal that generated them.
  • The ceramic particles in fly ash have three types of structures. The first type of particles are solid and are called precipitator. The second type of particles are hollow and is called cenospheres. The third type of particles are called plerospheres, which are hollow particles of large diameter filled with smaller size precipitator and cenospheres.

Thus Cenospheres are hard and rigid, light, waterproof, in noxious, and insulative. This makes them highly useful in a variety of products, notably fillers.